Reading 2 - CV 2010


Read the following article about happiness. Then decide if the statements below are true or false according to the text, and put a cross (x) in the corresponding column. The first one has been done for you as an example. (8 x 1 = 8 marks)

 

To be or not to be... happy

Last year was difficult for many of us, and 2010 is unlikely to be very different. So much so that the Department of Health has launched a stress-busting Credit Crunch helpline to ‘offer practical advice, guide you to useful online resources and put you in touch with other people who can help’. What impact the helpline will have on the mental wellbeing of the nation remains to be seen, but I am not overly optimistic. This year I would like to suggest that you don’t worry too much about your physical health, and concentrate instead on being happier. So, with that in mind, here are five tips for a happier 2010.

Change your routine. Although many people find routines comforting, it is good to add variety. This may be as simple as going somewhere different on holiday, buying your clothes from a new shop or getting your hair cut by another stylist. Or try a new activity that you wouldn’t normally consider. Have you ever driven a racing car, ridden a horse, been to the opera, tried salsa or ballroom dancing, learnt how to paint or taken music lessons? Not your cup of tea? Don’t you believe it — give it a go and you may be pleasantly surprised.

Don’t be too self-conscious. It is only natural to be concerned about how others perceive us, but they are rarely as interested as we think. You may be all too aware that you are having a bad hair day, that you have a spot on your chin or a ladder in your tights, but everyone else is probably too busy worrying about their own imperfections to notice yours. Don’t blow them out of proportion.

Control your anger. One person in three surveyed by the Mental Health Foundation knows someone inclined to angry outbursts. It is essential to learn some basic techniques to control your temper. You can ask The British Association of Anger Management about taking part in one of its courses.

Don’t criticise. Constructive criticism may be helpful, but in my experience well-directed applause works even better. Parents soon learn that a carrot works better than a stick, but we seem unwilling to transfer this knowledge to other aspects of our lives, like friends or work. Try it for a week and see what happens.

Buy a comfortable bed. If you already have a good bed, you will understand the benefits. If you are still sleeping on the £99 bed that you bought when you were first married, you won’t know what you are missing. Suffice to say that a good bed is the key to a decent night’s sleep, and a proper night’s sleep is the foundation upon which your mood the following day is likely to be based.

Adapted from: www.time.com

True-False Questions
Read the statements below and decide whether they are true or false according to the text.


According to the author, 2010 won’t probably be easy.

Verdadero Falso


Monotony is always bad.

Verdadero Falso


We have a clear idea of the effect the helpline will have

Verdadero Falso


You might be wrong about the activities you think you can enjoy.

Verdadero Falso


We tend to exaggerate how much other people notice our imperfections.

Verdadero Falso


The author says we should concentrate on other people’s defects.

Verdadero Falso


One person out of three loses their temper easily.

Verdadero Falso


You should praise adults as well as children.

Verdadero Falso


People who don’t sleep in a good bed are perfectly aware of the advantages of having one.

Verdadero Falso